Projects We're Funding

20
Jul
2016

"Remyelination and the Microbiome”: Progress so far

Robin Franklin is Professor of Stem Cell Medicine and Head of Translational Science at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. His lab works on the mechanisms of CNS regeneration with a particular focus on remyelination, an adult stem/precursor cell-mediated process in which new myelin sheaths are restored to demyelinated axons. 

We have awarded a grant to Professor Robin Franklin for research into ways of promoting the regeneration of lost myelin and in particular to explore the hypothesis that microbiome may have a determining role in remyelination of the central nervous system.

Update from Robin Franklin on Microbiome Research

Robin Franklin is Professor of Stem Cell Medicine and Head of Translational Science at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

Research Grant Awarded to Professor Robin Franklin

Robin Franklin is Professor of Stem Cell Medicine and Head of Translational Science at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. His lab works on the mechanisms of CNS regeneration with a particular focus on remyelination, an adult stem/precursor cell-mediated process in which new myelin sheaths are restored to demyelinated axons. 

We have awarded a grant to Professor Robin Franklin for research into ways of promoting the regeneration of lost myelin and in particular to explore the hypothesis that microbiome may have a determining role in remyelination of the central nervous system.

Myelin Project USA Grant Request: California Assembly Bill 1559

The Myelin Project USA's main objectives are to:
Fund scientific and clinical research
Give financial assistance to low income families
Raise awareness and education of ALD
Legislate and advocacy for Newborn Screening legislation

Adrenoleukodystrophy is a devastating genetic disease that can be treated and stopped if it is caught before physical symptoms show. Unfortunately, the rare disease is not well known in the medical community and the symptoms are commonly misdiagnosed. When proper diagnosis is finally reached it can be too late to save the affected child. This tragic result can be prevented if the affected individual and their doctors know they have the disease and can obtain lifesaving treatments early enough. We believe testing for ALD in newborns is the most effective way to do this.